An Ode to 'Whole Lotta Rosie': Rock's Big Girl Banger

Queen had their “Fat Bottom Girls.” U2 had their b-side tribute to the wonder that are pregnant women with “Big Girls Are Best.” However, the definitive rock anthem for plus-size ladies everywhere is AC/DC’s “Whole Lotta Rosie.” Featured on Let There Be Rock, the band’s fourth studio album released on March 21, 1977, “Whole Lotta Rosie” brings the LP to an epic close and has become one of the most beloved tracks in AC/DC’s catalog.

This is the Most Annoying Thing About the Rock Hall Nominations Every Year

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame nominations and the subsequent class selections are easily the most popular debate topics in the rock world every year. Regardless of who actually is nominated and voted into the Rock Hall, the discussions around the whole process are passionate, lengthy and often fun. However, without fail, one take is always dragged out year after year by someone, and frankly, it must stop.

Ozzy Osbourne's 'Ordinary Man' Was One Of The Bright Spots Of 2020

Considering everything that happened in 2020, it’s actually quite easy to forget about some of the positive things from this year, especially if they happened pre-coronavirus, which seems like another lifetime ago. However, something rock fans the world over need to be grateful for this year was the release of Ordinary Man, the twelfth studio album from Ozzy Osbourne. Released on February 21, Ordinary Man marked Ozzy’s first new album since 2010’s Scream. Despite being shut out from receiving a

Pink Floyd: Looking Back on Their Live 8 Reunion Performance

Pink Floyd and their reunion at Live 8 in 2005 was the band’s first performance with Roger Waters, who celebrates his birthday today (September 6), in 24 years. While held to the tight 20-minute set time that every performer had during the benefit concert, Pink Floyd, without question, owned the event with their setlist of “Breath,” “Money,” “Wish You Were Here” and “Comfortably Numb.” While Waters and David Gilmour did butt heads regarding the setlist and took some convincing to agree to the

2020 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominees: 9 Women Artists Who Were Snubbed

From May 2011 to February 2012, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame featured an exhibit called “Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power.” From September 2012 to August 2014, the exhibit traveled around to various museums in the United States. It made its final stop at The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Mich. where I was given a private tour of the collection from over 70 different performers, from Janis Joplin and Tina Turner to Chrissie Hynde and Stevie Nicks. While the exhibit’s artifacts dated bac

Sarfraz Manzoor Recounts His Most Unique Encounter with Bruce Springsteen

Sarfraz Manzoor delved deep into his Bruce Springsteen fandom in his memoir Greetings from Bury Park, which has been adapted into the film Blinded By The Light that opens tomorrow (August 16.) One of the most interesting facts about his fandom is the fact he’s seen The Boss in concert over 150 times. With that many shows, there’s plenty of different venues where he’s seen Springsteen live, but one of his most memorable experiences took place in a very intimate setting: “This isn’t a venue at a

'Blinded By The Light: Writer Sarfraz Manzoor Talks About Film Adaptation of His Memoir, Springsteen's Blessing

Growing up, most people have that band or singer that forever changes you, and it’s that moment and mountain-moving feeling that’s at the core of Blinded By The Light. The film is based on Greetings from Bury Park, a memoir by Sarfraz Manzoor that chronicles how the music of Bruce Springsteen impacted his life growing up as a Pakistani teenager in a small English town during the 1980s. Manzoor co-wrote the screenplay with director Gurinder Chadha, best known for 2002’s Bend It Like Beckham, and

REVIEW: 'Rocketman' Touches Down Where 'Bohemian Rhapsody' Should Have Landed

Let’s cut to the chase: With the release of the Elton John film Rocketman, there are undoubtedly going to be a lot of comparisons between this film and the uber-successful Freddie Mercury/Queen biopic Bohemian Rhapsody. That’s unavoidable since two films about two British music icons are being released less than a year apart. What’s also unavoidable is this truth: Rocketman is the far superior film, for many reasons. For starters, Rocketman certainly isn’t your average biopic. For most of the p

We All Need to Give Up on a Led Zeppelin Reunion

There are many musical moments that are celebrating their 50th anniversary this year, and among those are the 50th anniversaries of Led Zeppelin I and Led Zeppelin II. In recent years, the Zeppelin catalog has received a massive reissue campaign, and in honor of their big 5-0, the band, as a brand, has expanded to include various partnerships from Vans to Burton Snowboards. But if there’s one thing that shouldn’t happen along with Zeppelin’s golden anniversary, it’s a reunion. Robert Plant has

Motley Crue: The Trouble With 'The Dirt'

I’m not one for early mornings, but I was finally able to get out of bed around 5:30 AM to watch the highly-anticipated film adaptation of the Motley Crue memoir The Dirt. In hindsight, I should have requested a press screener from Netflix, but sometimes life and never-ending to-do lists distract you from thinking logically. Twenty minutes after finishing the movie, my groggy mind was struggling to figure out what exactly was wrong with The Dirt. Something just didn’t feel right once the 10
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